Nonsexist writing a business

Often, we are not aware that we are using sexist language because many of these expressions are traditionally used in writing, such as generic he or his.

Nonsexist writing a business

The most easily recognizable form of sexist writing occurs in a sentence such as this: When a student writes a paper, he must proofread carefully. Such a sentence assumes that all students are male.

When a student writes a paper, he or she should use the spellchecker on his or her computer. To solve the problem gracefully, try making the subject of the sentence plural: When students write their papers, they should use the spellcheckers on their computers.

Another way to erase sexist language is to substitute a noun subject instead of a pronoun. Ask him to define the thesis. Ask the writer to define the thesis.

When we students write our papers, we must proofread carefully. When a teacher is strict about spelling, his students will spend more time proofreading. When you are strict about spelling, your students will spend more time proofreading.

The change in person does not alter the meaning of either of the sentences; it merely erases the sexist language. The search for a gender-neutral singular pronoun When the subject of a sentence is a specific but unidentified individual, making the subject plural does not make sense: Who dropped his ticket?

Somebody left his sweater. In both of these sentences, the subject must be singular; only one person dropped the ticket and only one person left the sweater. When possible, simply drop the pronoun altogether and substitute a nondescriptive article: Who dropped a ticket?

Somebody left a sweater. Who dropped their ticket? Somebody left their sweater. Either Mary or John should bring a schedule with her or him. Either Mary or John should bring a schedule with them. Some texts offer it as a solution, but we recommend that you be wary of using it in formal writing, as some professors may take offense.

When in doubt, ask your professors what they prefer. Often, these terms are the hardest to avoid without making the writing sound stilted. However, there are alternatives.

Mykol Hamilton, Nancy Henley and Barrie Thorne, among others, insist that we must find alternate terms for those that are inherently sexist.Business writers should consider the tone of their message, whether they are writing a memo, letter, report, or any type of business document.

Tone is present in all communication activities. Sexist writing is language which excludes one of the sexes. For example, writing “all of the policemen gathered at the parade” is sexist because it excludes women. The correct word to use is “police offers.” History reveals vague periods of time when sexist language might have evolved.

Chapters STUDY. PLAY. Build Goodwill - right tone of voice - You-Attitude (preferred writing styles, taboo words, preferred structure and level of detail) 6) How will your audience use the document?

Ch 5 Creating Effective business Messages. 88 terms. BA Final (cumulative) 31 terms.

nonsexist writing a business

When writing, it is a courtesy to your readers to use language that does not demean or stereotype men or women. Often, we are not aware that we are using sexist language because many of these expressions are traditionally used in writing, such as generic he or his. The first book on business writing I ever bought was The Handbook of Nonsexist Writing: For writers, editors, and speakers by Casey Miller and Kate Swift (The Women’s Press, ).

I still have it on my bookshelf, and it’s available on Amazon. When you are writing about people in general, many of your professors will expect you to use “inclusive ” or “ nonsexist ” language, that is, gender neutral language. The need for inclusive language arises because according to widely accepted norms of current usage, masculine pronouns no longer communicate a generic sense of “anyone.”.

The Basic Business Letter // Purdue Writing Lab